Category Archives: Camping Supplies Near Me

Let Garage Organizers Keep at Least One Room in your House Organized!

Let’s face it, if you have kids, you have a lot of STUFF! I have four kids, and they are all active in various activities and like to do different things. The variety of their outdoor toys include:Balls (basketballs, footballs, baseballs, soccer balls etc.)Accessories such as mitts, bats and shin guardsBikes (and unicycles!) with helmetsRoller blades and necessary padsSkate boardsSkis (for us older people) and Snow boards (the younger generation)Footwear (winter and ski boots, snow shoes)Camping equipment (tents, coolers, propane stoves and lanterns etc.)Fishing poles and equipmentUnlike indoor toys, most of these items are not usually kept in my kids’ rooms, but in the garage for easy access. My struggle is to constantly keep things organized so that we can find what is needed, when we need it, and quickly. I have quite a few home built shelves in my garage as well as many handy hooks, but when I found out that a friend was moving into a brand new house and could organize her garage from scratch, I was jealous!

I love to organize, and garage organizers are one of the greatest things invented since sliced bread. Lucky me, she asked for my advice, and I was happy to oblige. Besides all of their toys, they also had a lot of gardening tools and her husband likes to do wood working, so there were a lot of items to organize, important if they also wanted to put their cars in the garage.

My first recommendation in garage organizers was to get a full storage system to go along one wall. The full system included various full length cupboards, as well as lower cupboards with a work space and then cupboards up above, just like in a kitchen. This type of system was perfect for her husbands tools because the wall above the work space comes with a slat or peg wall where many of the often used tools can be hanged for quick and easy access. These types of garage organizers are systems that come in all sorts of configurations and materials, so anybody can find something that will work for them.

Along the second wall is where I suggested putting the garage organizers that I am most excited about. These are the systems with a lot of customization options, and can easily be rearranged at any time to fit evolving needs. These are the garage organizers that include all the handy shelves, baskets and variety of hooks. There are different systems out there that all use the same basic structure. First, there are slat type pieces that attach to your garage wall. These can usually be purchased in different widths and lengths. You can create an entire wall of slats, or just one slat that is 4′ long, it just depends on your needs and available space.

Once you have the wall attachments in place, that is where the fun begins! You can get hanging baskets (wire or mesh) for all of your balls, there are shelves with hooks attached to the bottom for hanging bikes or other items, and then there are all sorts of different sized and shaped hooks for hanging most anything onto the wall. From these hooks you can hang ladders, hoses, garden tools, dollies, extension cords, leaf blowers, skis and snow boards (you can rest them on two hooks), fishing poles and the list goes on. You can also find garage organizers with special shelves designed for different items, such as a shoe rack or a cleaning caddy. Some systems have fold away work stations, which is great for gardening supplies and potting plants. Some system even have small bins for storing really small items (nuts and bolts). The best thing is that these garage organizers (hooks, shelves, baskets etc.) can be moved around and arranged on the slat wall any way necessary.

Yes, I am going to have a lot of fun organizing my friends garage. With all of the different garage organizers available today, and the great flexibility of the different systems, I will be able to find a place for everything that she needs to store, and she will be able to access it easily. Best of all, everything will have its own place, so the garage will STAY organized.

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Escaping From the Daily Grind

One of the best things about summer is the camping opportunity that allows people to take a day of two and get out of their homes and into the great outdoors. Hooking up a tent trailer or RV and heading out in to wilderness for a short vacation is a wonderful way to relax and unwind from the rigors of the daily grind. Within a few short hours a family can load up a trailer, hitch up the family SUV and head out into nature for an overnight adventure with many of the comforts of home safely in tow.

Camping has become easier and more convenient through the use of RVs and camp trailers that allow people to spend time outdoors without roughing it in the wilderness. The old tents are not necessary when a trailer provides campers with shelter and a more comfortable place to lay down at the end of day spent fishing or hiking in the wilderness. Hooking up the trailer is a relatively easy chore, and with the right amount of pulling power from a truck or SUV the possibilities for a weekend getaway become virtually limitless.

There are also many accessories that can be added to an RV to make the experience of camping out even more enjoyable with things like propane stoves and portable showers there is no need to go out collecting firewood or going without bathing for a few days out doors. The ease and availability of a trailer make camping a lot less work than it once was. There was a time when pitching a tent took up time and after the shelter was up a fire pit had to be dug and wood gathered before a fire could be used to cook the evening meal, but those days are passing as more and more families are turning to the camp trailer or RV to provide a mobile camping experience where campers can set up their sites in relatively shorter time frames and spend more of their vacation hours enjoying the countryside instead of building a campsite.

Setting up a campfire for roasting marshmallows and telling stories around is still a wonderful experience that campers enjoy, but knowing that a meal can be prepared over a propane powered stove makes it much easier to get a hot meal with an easier cleanup.

The next time you think about a weekend retreat or getting away from it all for few days of rest consider taking out an RV and enjoy your break instead of breaking your back with all of the cumbersome camping gear that grandpa used to use.

Bulverde Home Theater (http://www.tweetys.com/) has been selling RV accessories online, and have thousands of satisfied customers all over the world. Art Gib is a freelance writer.

Safe Cooking in the Outdoors With the Trekmates Flameless Cooking System

These are just some of the things you have to remember for safe cooking in the outdoors:

1. Have a bucket of water and sand ready for putting out fires and a rake for extinguishing hot embers.

2. Don’t run around campfires and limit the number of people around a campfire or fire pit at any time.

3. Don’t build fires near dry grass, piles of leaves, low-hanging trees, and shrubs.

4. Keep extra firewood and kindling away from fires and pit areas.

5. Use long-handled cooking utensils.

6. If you’re cooking with fire, don’t wear clothing made of vinyl, nylon, plastic, or other synthetic materials. If you get burned while wearing these, the material can melt onto your skin and require medical assistance to remove.

7. If your hair is long, tie it back before cooking on or near a campfire.

8. Keep fires for cooking as small as possible.

9. Don’t cook with fire in an enclosed space such as a tent, boat, cabin, or teepee.

10. Avoid shaking, dropping, or puncturing your gas canister.

11. Use stoves only in well-ventilated areas.

12. Always use the stove’s igniter to light it. To reduce the risks of burns and other injury in case of a gas explosion, try to keep all body parts away from the stove during the process of ignition.

All those reminders make the idea of camping kind of frightening, don’t they? If you stop to think about all the dangers involved in outdoor cooking, you might not want to do it ever again! Fortunately, there is a device for cooking in the outdoors that does not make use of gas, petrol, propane, or wood. In fact, it doesn’t require a fire to heat and cook food and beverages. This revolutionary method of safe cooking is the Trekmates Flameless Cook System.

Cooking outdoors was once a tedious activity that required lugging bulky stoves, gas tanks, and pots or pans, gathering wood, and dealing with clunky stoves. With the Trekmates Flameless Cook System, all you have to do is place your food in the Flameless Cook Box, place a Heatpack and some water in the outer box, place the cooking box in the outer box, cover it, and let the system do its magic. There is also a Flameless Cook Flask for hot cups of coffee, chocolate, or soup. Once your food or drink is ready, you don’t have to transfer it to a different container. The Cook Box and the Cook Flask are both wrapped in a neoprene sleeve which keeps the contents heated while allowing you to hold them comfortably. Food and drink stays hot as you heat and clean-up is a breeze.

Because the Trekmates flameless cooking system eliminates the hazards of fire, parents of youngsters and children going camping (with their school, Scout or Youth Group, or for the Duke of Edinburgh Award Scheme, for instance) can rest assured that their tents won’t go up in flames from cooking fires. This is also a perfect safe cooking option for families with little children, Scouts and guides, climbers, boat owners, and winter exploration groups.

Are you looking for more information regarding safe cooking? Visit http://www.trekmates.co.uk today!

More Camping Wood Stoves For Tents Articles

Bringing The Right Equipment When Going Camping

Many families go camping at State Parks because the camping facilities offer all the comforts of home while people sleep in tents. People that use recreational vehicles for camping have many of these conveniences inside the RV but do tend to need other outdoor camping equipment that a tent owner would not necessarily pack up for a weekend away. Recreational vehicle owners are more centered on spending time at a nice recreation spot and need outdoor camping equipment that is solid.

For entertaining outdoors, a recreational vehicle owner would truly enjoy having a folding table to cook on. These tables are rigid and could support an outdoor grill nicely with enough room left over to play cards with friends throughout the afternoon. Folding chairs would make good outdoor camping equipment because nice furniture would be left inside the RV and the owners would not have to worry about anyone getting wet if it remained outside the recreational vehicle all night.

The campsite would be more efficient with these two sturdy camping accessories but some recreational vehicle owners might prefer benches. These outdoor furniture items make camping outdoors more believable because they can be made of steel but resemble real wood. All of these pieces of camping equipment can be taken apart and stored in the recreational vehicle while the campers are enroute to another recreation area or the long tables will fit nicely on top if tied down well.

Some outdoor enthusiasts get tired of traveling after a while and will often rent a lot at an RV park. Other RV’er enthusiasts will be there and some will use outdoor camping equipment to create a marvelous backyard for friends to enjoy when they stop over for dinner or a game of cards. Recreational vehicle owners might have to ask permission to use camping equipment while in the park, but often the owners will allow hammocks to be tied to trees on the lot.

During inclement weather, a recreational vehicle owner might choose to use other types of camping equipment that would normally be reserved for State Parks or other outdoor camping uses. Butane lanterns can come in very handy when power goes out in an RV park, and visibility is low enough to make trips to the washrooms and laundry treacherous. If propane is not offered at the RV park, then the option of using camping equipment like propane stoves would be justified if the RV owner has a good supply of the little tanks in the storage spaces in the RV.

During power shortages, camping equipment such as ice chests will be needed to preserve food stuffs until power is restored. Campers use sleeping bags and tents when temperature rise and the recreational vehicle’s air conditioning cannot be run due to battery back up system malfunctioning during this period. Campers rely on camping equipment to carry them through difficult times. Under the worst conditions, campers will know that they will have a dry place to sleep at night and hot meals to eat at night.

Coleman Stove : The Ultimate Convenience!

Tents, portable lighting devices and stoves that you can operate almost anywhere are Coleman’s popular products. Coleman Company have produced quality camping gears.

You will feel like cooking in your own house with Coleman Stove. These camping stoves also allow you to enjoy your catch fish from the boat while in fishing trip. A portable stove is hardcore campers which convenient as having comfortable tent to sleep in and to keep your beverage cold and your fresh food you can use trusty cooler.

In the market today you can find a lot of Coleman stoves . Find what best for you from the material they use, the fuels, number of burners and so on. Discover the factors and the features that might be help you to pick the perfect camping stove and to let you acquainted with them.

A separate attachment for burner and an extra grill need not by most of Coleman Stove. To limit time for preparation and set up requirement, the burner sits comfortably on top of propane tank to ease of use, that’s the perfect flow by burner propane stove.

The fact is Coleman has produced stoves that have multiple grills and burners built right on the unit. Enthusiasts of course would have the tendency to have more, this idea attractive to some. Choose a stove with double burners or those which can be converted to grills.

Almost all of the Coleman Stove are made of nickel chrome grate but some of them also made of lighter models like stainless steel, aluminum, porcelain coated grills.

Most of outfitter would pick this over lighter alternative even though Coleman stoves made in this material have the tendency to weight more. Nickel chrome grate is easier to clean than aluminum and stainless steel, that’s the main reason to pick them. It also can be powered by several types of fuel. Find the fuels that will work best for is the key.

If you like a no-fuss preparation, propane might be your best choice in this case. Some people prefer this over the rest of the fuels because it doesn’t require liquid refueling, oil or using wicks although the fuel cans a bit heavier than others. What you have to do is pop it in that’s all and you ready to go.

The Coleman fuel might be number one on their list for those who do not mind liquid fuel because Coleman fuel is more clean, efficient and dependable. The Coleman fuel burns steadier and hotter unlike other fuel which performance usually diminish on subzero degree temperature or cold weather. It can be refilled for your next camping trip because they come in lighter containers or canisters.

There also some Coleman stoves made for Kerosene, Butane, Powermax fuels and unleaded gasoline beside two mentioned above. It gives you alternatives and the freedom to choose that’s the good thing about Coleman Stove.

Want to find out more about Coleman Stove, then visit Erwan Go’s site on how to choose the best Outdoor Wood Stoves for your needs.

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Planning a Camping Trip

Tent camping is definitely an activity my loved ones continues to be involved in for many years. Our camping trips combine fishing, hiking, and swimming to the regular camp site lifetime of cutting wood, starting a fireplace, food preparation, cooking, eating, games, and relaxing. We’ve made a lot of good memories from your camping trips. We’ve always risen in high altitude and found great camping hiking spots either at designated campgrounds that offer water for washing, and some kind of restroom (out house or rest-stop type), and garbage cans, or places where there have been no creature comforts at all. We always camped by streams, lakes, or rivers throughout the summertime.

If you plan to possess a successful camping experience, planning is essential. As a retired Army Airborne Ranger, that has needed to live of the ruck (back pack) for a lot of days, having the right camping gear when you’re camping can make the experience much more fun.
The best tents for people are tents that have separate rooms. Since we now have two children our tent has three rooms — we sleep in a room, the kids sleep inside a room, and also the entrance room is perfect for dressing and storage. We use a combination of foam and inflatable mattresses. We use rectangular sleeping-bags that you could zip together for that wife and that i, and the kids have their own individual bags.

Bring extra blankets for chilly nights. We also use poncho liners for the kids to make use of of their sleeping-bags. We’ve had our tent for more than Many years and average 2-3 camping trips each summer.

We also have a couple of tarps. We use one tarp on the ground under the tent making it long enough to have about 8 feet in front of the tent door. We take our shoes/boots off outside to keep the inside from the tent as clean as you possibly can. We bring a small folding stool to place outside the tent door to assist with putting shoes on. The 2nd tarp can be used to cover our kitchen/cooking gear if it rains.

We use two camping stoves – one uses propane (which we mainly use for heating water for hot drinks and washing) and also the other is a 2 burner stove and uses fuel, which doesn’t burn as hot. We make use of this one to cook bacon, pancakes, eggs, etc. Bring a few frying pans, and camping pots/pans – make sure to bring a spatula if you are going to cook pancakes or eggs. We always start a fire in the morning(for warmth) as well as in the evening, for cooking.

Bring a collapsible grate to put over the fire if you plan on laying anything onto it to cook or heat up. We make pointed sticks by cutting small branches from nearby trees for that polish dogs or bratwurst – so bring a few knives. We cut our own wood in the dead branches and logs you discover close to the campground. We bring an axe and small saw with a folding blade to get the wood the right size to fit in the fire bowl.

James has been writing articles on the great outdoors for several years now. Come visit his latest website talking about inflatable canoes where you can find the best inflatable canoe reviews for that great outdoor trip vacation.

More Camping Wood Stoves For Tents Articles

Camping Tents – The Involved Components

When going hiking or camping or any other similar activities, it’s important to take along all the essential gear you’ll need. From stoves, to sleeping bags , food to spare clothes, there are some essentials and luxuries and you’ll need to decide which is most integral not only to survival, but also to having a good trip. Tents are among the most essential equipment as they provide shelter from the weather and insects as well as any other potential dangers. When going on a trip, it’s important you have all the pieces you’ll need for your camping tents, some of which come with the tent, others which will likely need replacing at one point or another.

Components

The tent itself is usually made from a waterproof material. The main focus of this material is to prevent liquid from getting inside the tent, but will let water vapor leave. This prevents extreme amounts of condensation from building up from the inhabitants’ breathing. For double-skin tents, this material will be on the outside, while the inside will be a mesh material.

Outside the tent, there is an area called the vestibule. It’s sheltered, but has no ground covering and is generally used for activities which are unsuitable for the interior of the tent. Such activities may be cooking or the storage of equipment.

The groundsheet goes beneath the tent and prevents water moisture from being absorbed through the bottom of the tent. Like the tent, it’s waterproof and can be used with double-skin tents, even though they have a groundsheet sewn into the bottom usually. There are a number of effective ways to use a groundsheet, but this is usually determined by time, tent and groundsheet size and space constraints.

To provide a structure, poles are used to hold the tent in place and in its correct shape. These poles can be thick or thin, collapsible or rigid. The type of pole is determined by the tent’s purpose with larger tents have stronger, rigid poles and small tents have lightweight, collapsible poles.

Pegs and stakes make sure that the tent is held in position and sometimes in shape, if the tent has guide lines. These pegs can be made from wood, metal and plastic, but all must be driven deep into the ground for the best results. If not used correctly, there can be serious consequences.

Looking for more info on the essential parts of camping tents ? Get the low down in our complete camping tents guide.

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15 Camping Stove Safety Rules

Even experienced, knowledgeable campers can sometimes overlook or neglect a basic rule, and sometimes serious injuries and property damage are the result. Review these 15 camping stove safety rules and remember to practice them each and every time you cook outdoors.

1.) Always follow the manufacturer’s instructions for setting up, using, extinguishing and cleaning your camping stove.

2.) Never allow children to operate the camping stove or play near where the stove is being used.

3.) Pets can accidentally knock camping stoves over or off of picnic tables. Keep pets restrained or otherwise restricted from the area where a camping stove is being used.

4.) If you are using charcoal, never dump hot coals into a garbage can, garbage bag or any container that can melt or catch fire. If possible, allow them to fully cool in the stove before dumping the coals. If that is not possible, bring a metal container where hot coals can be placed. Never set the metal container with hot coals on grass, pine needles or other flammable substances.

5.) Always use hot pads or oven mitts when working with camping stoves. If a stove starts to tip over, you can reach out with the oven mitt to right it. Make sure to use high quality hot pads or oven mitts that are made of flame resistant and fire retardant materials.

6.) Use the camping stove a safe distance away from campers, tents or other structures. If you are using a picnic table, make sure it is made of concrete or another material that is fire and flame resistant. Some wooden picnic tables are not suitable for using a table top camping stove or grill.

7.) If you are using propane gas to fuel your camping stove, remember that propane gas is heavier than air. The propane will sink to the ground if there is a leak. Never smoke cigarettes or use other fire starters if a propane tank is in use.

8.) Electric camping stoves should never be used with standard household extension cords. If you need to use an extension cord, use a heavy duty extension cord from a hardware or home improvement store.

9.) Electric stoves should never be plugged into an outlet with other appliances.

10.) Some people light charcoal immediately after pouring it on, and others wait a few minutes. Whatever your practice, make sure that the lighter fluid is sitting safely away from the unit before lighting it.

11.) Use the long lighters designed for lighting grills. The pocket models are not safe for use with grills.

12.) Even if it seems impolite, ask that friends and guests – especially children – stay a safe distance from the camping stove while in use.

13.) Safe the largest quantity of beer and other alcoholic beverages for after the cooking is done. Drinking effects motor skills as well as judgment, and the two are a bad mix.

14.) If a fire has to be suddenly extinguished, be sure to do so thoroughly. Hot embers can burn for hours, and a strong wind can spread them quickly.

15.) Never go to sleep or leave the campsite until the stove is completely extinguished.

Remembering these 15 camping stove safety rules will keep you and your family safe and help you have an enjoyable time cooking outdoors.

Alexander Sutton enjoys the entire consumer experience from top to bottom and enjoys the opportunity to help others protect themselves from scams while uncovering budget-friendly solutions across a variety of industries. For more information, please visit 15 Camping Stove Safety Rules.

More Camping Wood Stoves For Tents Articles

The Basics of Tent Camping

Tent camping is an activity my family has been involved in for many years. Our camping trips combine fishing, hiking, and swimming to the regular camp site life of cutting wood, starting a fire, food preparation, cooking, eating, games, and just relaxing. We’ve made a lot of good memories from our camping trips. We’ve always gone up in the mountains and found great camping hiking spots either at designated campgrounds that offer water for washing, and some type of restroom (out house or rest-stop type), and garbage cans, or places where there were no creature comforts at all. We always camped by streams, lakes, or rivers during the summer months.

If you intend to have a successful camping experience, planning is important. As a retired Army Airborne Ranger, who has had to live out of a ruck (back pack) for many days, having the right camping gear when you’re camping will make the experience that much more enjoyable.

The best camping tents for families are tents that have separate rooms. Since we have two children our tent has three rooms — my wife and I sleep in a room, the kids sleep in a room, and the entrance room is for dressing and storage. We use a combination of foam and inflatable mattresses. We use rectangular sleeping bags that you can zip together for the wife and I, and the kids have their own individual bags. Bring extra blankets for chilly nights. We also use poncho liners for the kids to use inside their sleeping bags . We’ve had our tent for over 15 years and average 2-3 camping trips each summer.

We also take a couple of tarps. We use one tarp on the ground under the tent and make it long enough to have about 8 feet in front of the tent door. We take our shoes/boots off outside to keep the inside of the tent as clean as possible. We bring a small folding stool to place outside the tent door to help with putting shoes on. The second tarp is used to cover our kitchen/cooking gear if it rains.

We use two camping stoves – one uses propane (which we mainly use for heating water for hot drinks and washing) and the other is a 2 burner stove and uses fuel, which does not burn as hot. We use this one for cooking bacon, pancakes, eggs, etc. Bring a couple of frying pans, and camping pots/pans – remember to bring a spatula if you’re going to cook pancakes or eggs.

We always start a fire in the morning(for warmth) and in the evening, for cooking. Bring a collapsible grate to put over the fire if you plan on laying anything on it to cook or heat up. We make pointed sticks by cutting small branches from nearby trees for the polish dogs or bratwurst – so bring a couple of knives. We cut our own wood from the dead branches and logs you find near the campground. We bring an axe and small saw with a folding blade to get the wood the right size to fit in the fire pit.

Here are the basics of camping gear to bring:

Tent with rain fly, tarp, tent stakes, and hammer

Sleeping gear to include mattresses – inflatable or foam, blankets (poncho liners), and pillows

Cooking/kitchen equipment – camping stoves, folding camping table, frying pans, pots to heat water and cook in, paper plates, bowls, and utensils, napkins, paper towels, wash rags, towels, cutlery, large spoons, tongs, can opener, lighters, tin foil, plastic wash basin, scouring pads, disposable wipes, detergent, plastic storage bags, and trash bags. We pack this in see-though plastic tubs with folding lids. We pack most of our non-cooler food in these types of containers, too.

Fire pit necessities – if you plan on scrounging your own wood from the forest floor – axe, folding saw, gloves, newspaper for fire starting, lighter, a folding grate (campfire tripod), and a folding shovel.

Personal hygiene – soap, wash cloths, towels (dark in color), shampoo and shower shoes (if your campground has a shower), toothpaste, and toilet paper.

Safety equipment – flashlights, lantern, spare batteries, cell phone with car charger, map of the area, first aid kit, compass or GPS, and plenty of drinking water.

These are some of the items you’ll need to have an enjoyable camping trip. After your first trip, you’ll be able to fine-tune your list. Tent camping takes a lot of prep work, but it is so worth it for the memories you’ll always have.

I’ve been tent camping for over 30 years and as a retired Airborne Ranger, have experience in wilderness survival. For more information on camping tents and camping hiking gear, please visit us at http://mycampingtentsandmore.com. We carry a nice selection of camping gear from tents to flashlights at reasonable prices. Check us out.